1.29.2016

Film Fun Folio #19 - Kodak Autographic 1A and Velvia 100F

Periodically, I'll be posting scans of some complete rolls of film on here, showing both the good and the bad, and giving some basic information as well a little write up of the shoot as well as the reasons why I selected each camera and film.  Enjoy the trip! 

Feature #19:
Camera: ca. 1929 Kodak Autographic 1A Camera with f/7.9 lens
Film: Fuji Velvia 100F
Locale: Frederick County, MD.

Once an instantly endeared additon to the collection for the size and quality of the images it could provide, the 116 format Kodak 1A camera had been sitting idly for a while as my attention turned to the larger 122 format 3A camera for experimental purposes.  On my fall rambles through Frederick County, Maryland, I decided to give this camera a shot to see what it could do with some bright Central Maryland landscapes in the shadows of the Catoctin Mountains.  


1 - Thurmont, MD - f/8, 1/25 - The roll starts off on a fuzzy, blurry note.  Had I propped this on a tripod, I might have had a better result.




2 - Frederick, MD - f/8, 1/50 - As morning shadows slowly shorten, there is still a hue of golden hour light on this shot, but the Kodak's lens doesn't do the best color rendition or distant focus with this scene.  

3 - Jefferson, MD - f/9, 1/50 - The best of the batch comes right in the middle.  It is a nicely composed, nicely lit, and nicely exposed scene.  The overall rendering is not the sharpest, but the Kodak is adequate enough in its rendering.


4 - Jefferson, MD - f/14, 1/50 - Composing on the awful "Brilliant Finder" is not always easy, and in this case, I overcompensated for a perceived imbalance in the horizon and this was the result.  Oops.


5 - Harmony, MD - f/14, 1/50 - Hideously overexposed and with a bad slant in the horizon, this shot was barely salvageable in post processing.  Seems like a follow up trip to Harmony is in order.


Thoughts: Not a lot of Autographic Magic in these Kodak moments.  The third shot showed a bit of potential, but the others are all woeful in some way or another,  It seems my use of color film in this old classic is more wasteful than wonderful.